[WINEDOCS] User Guide Update

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[WINEDOCS] User Guide Update

Brian Vincent
Wine User Guide update attached.  There's lots of areas that could be
explained better, but at least it's a usable starting point.  Some
things to note:

1.  Can Wine still use a ~/.wine/wine.userreg file?  It's described in
the doc, but I'm not sure that still works.

2.  I have no idea where I got the "System Administration Tips" from.
If I came up with that myself last year, then I think it needs to be
revisited.  It doesn't look right to me, but the idea isn't too far off.

3.  Most of the changes are to wineusr-configuring.sgml.

4.  After applying, you can remove en/wineusr-fonts.sgml,
en/wineusr-printing.sgml, en/wineusr-registry.sgml.  Both printing and
font support could be described better.

As usual, spelling and grammatical errors have been left for Francois
to find ;)

-Brian


Index: en/Makefile.in
===================================================================
RCS file: /cvsroot/wine/docs/en/Makefile.in,v
retrieving revision 1.4
diff -u -u -r1.4 Makefile.in
--- en/Makefile.in 12 Jul 2005 04:18:51 -0000 1.4
+++ en/Makefile.in 17 Oct 2005 07:11:15 -0000
@@ -8,12 +8,9 @@
 WINEUSR_SRCS = \
  wineusr-bugs.sgml \
  wineusr-configuring.sgml \
- wineusr-fonts.sgml \
  wineusr-getting.sgml \
  wineusr-glossary.sgml \
  wineusr-introduction.sgml \
- wineusr-printing.sgml \
- wineusr-registry.sgml \
  wineusr-running.sgml
 
 WINEDEV_SRCS = \
Index: en/wineusr-bugs.sgml
===================================================================
RCS file: /cvsroot/wine/docs/en/wineusr-bugs.sgml,v
retrieving revision 1.4
diff -u -u -r1.4 wineusr-bugs.sgml
--- en/wineusr-bugs.sgml 25 Sep 2005 16:13:41 -0000 1.4
+++ en/wineusr-bugs.sgml 17 Oct 2005 07:11:16 -0000
@@ -16,7 +16,12 @@
       <sect2>
         <title>Verify your wine configuration</title>
         <para>
-        Refer to the <link linkend="config-verify">Configuration verification section</link>
+          Look at the output from <prompt>$ </prompt>
+          <userinput>wine --version</userinput> to make sure you're running
+          a recent version of Wine.  Launch winecfg and look over the
+          settings to make sure you have settings that look normal.  Look
+          in <filename>~/.wine/dosdevices</filename> to make sure you're
+          c: points to where you think it should.
         </para>
       </sect2>
 
Index: en/wineusr-configuring.sgml
===================================================================
RCS file: /cvsroot/wine/docs/en/wineusr-configuring.sgml,v
retrieving revision 1.4
diff -u -u -r1.4 wineusr-configuring.sgml
--- en/wineusr-configuring.sgml 25 Sep 2005 16:13:41 -0000 1.4
+++ en/wineusr-configuring.sgml 17 Oct 2005 07:11:16 -0000
@@ -1,2649 +1,756 @@
-  <chapter id="config-wine-main">
+<chapter id="config-wine-main">
     <title>Configuring Wine</title>
-    <para>
-      Now that you hopefully managed to successfully install
-      the Wine program files,
-      this chapter will tell you how to configure the Wine environment
-      properly to run your Windows programs.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      First, we'll give you an overview about which kinds of
-      configuration and program execution aspects a fully configured
-      Windows environment has to fulfill in order to ensure that many
-      Windows programs run successfully without encountering any
-      misconfigured or missing items.
-      Next, we'll show you which easy helper programs exist
-      to enable even novice users to complete the Wine environment
-      configuration in a fast and easy way.
-      The next section will explain the purpose of the Wine configuration file,
-      and we'll list all of its settings.
-      After that, the next section will detail the most important and
-      unfortunately most difficult configuration part:
-      how to configure the file system and DOS drive environment that
-      Windows programs need.
-      In the last step we'll tell you how to establish a working Windows
-      registry base.
-      Finally, the remaining parts of this chapter contain descriptions
-      of specific Wine configuration items that might also be
-      of interest to you.
-    </para>
-
-    <sect1 id="config-requirements-windows" xreflabel="--Installing Section--">
-      <title>What are the requirements of a fully working Windows environment?</title>
-
-        <para>
-          A Windows installation is a very complex structure. It consists of
-  many different parts with very different functionality.
-  We'll try to outline the most important aspects of it.
-        </para>
-
-        <itemizedlist>
-          <listitem>
-            <para>
-              Registry. Many keys are supposed to exist and contain
-              meaningful data, even in a newly-installed Windows.
-            </para>
-          </listitem>
-          <listitem>
-            <para>
-              Directory structure. Applications expect to find and/or
-              install things in specific predetermined locations. Most
-              of these directories are expected to exist. But unlike
-              Unix directory structures, most of these locations are
-              not hardcoded, and can be queried via the Windows API
-              and the registry. This places additional requirements on
-              a Wine installation.
-            </para>
-          </listitem>
-          <listitem>
-            <para>
-              System DLLs. In Windows, these usually reside in the
-              <filename>system</filename> (or
-              <filename>system32</filename>) directory. Some Windows
-              programs check for their existence in these
-              directories before attempting to load them. While Wine
-              is able to load its own internal DLLs
-              (<filename>.so</filename> files) when the program
-              asks for a DLL, Wine does not simulate the presence of
-              nonexistent files.
-            </para>
-          </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist>
-
-        <para>
-          While the users are of course free to set up everything
-          themselves, the Wine team will make the automated Wine source
-          installation script, <filename>tools/wineinstall</filename>,
-          do everything we find necessary to do; running the
-          conventional <userinput>configure && make depend && make && make
-            install</userinput> cycle is thus not recommended, unless
-          you know what you're doing. At the moment,
-          <filename>tools/wineinstall</filename> is able to create a
-          configuration file, install the registry, and create the
-          directory structure itself.
-        </para>
-
-    </sect1>
-
-    <sect1 id="config-helper-programs">
-      <title>Easy configuration helper programs</title>
-
-      <para>
-        Managing the Wine configuration file settings can be a
- difficult task, sometimes too difficult for some people.
- That's why there are some helper applications for easily setting up an
- initial wine configuration file with useful default settings.
-      </para>
-
-      
-      <sect2 id="config-helper-wineinstall">
-        <title>wineinstall</title>
- <para>
-  <command>wineinstall</command> is a small configuration tool
-  residing as <filename>tools/wineinstall</filename> in a Wine
-  source code tree.  It has been written to allow for an easy
-  and complete compilation/installation of Wine source code for
-  people who don't bother with reading heaps of very valuable
-  and informative documentation ;-)
- </para>
- <para>
-  Once you have successfully extracted the Wine source code
-  tree, change to the main directory of it and then run (as
-  user):
- </para>
-  <screen>
-  <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>./tools/wineinstall</userinput>
-  </screen>
- <para>
-  Doing so will compile Wine, install Wine and configure the
-  Wine environment (either by providing access to a Windows
-  partition or by creating a properly configured no-windows
-  directory environment).
- </para>
-
-      </sect2>
-<!--
-      Commenting out until winecfg doesn't actually do something.
-      <sect2 id="config-helper-winecfg">
-        <title>winecfg</title>
- <para>
-  <command>winecfg</command> is a small graphical configuration tool
-  residing as <filename>programs/winecfg</filename> in a Wine
-  source code tree. It is a Winelib app making use of standard
-  Win32 GUI controls to easily customize entries in a Wine
-  configuration file.
- </para>
-      </sect2>
--->
-    </sect1>
-
-    <sect1 id="config-verify">
-      <title>Verification of correct configuration</title>
-
-      <para>
-        TODO: After you have finished configuring Wine you can verify
-        your Wine configuration by running winecfg.
-        This functionality will be added to winecfg
-        in the near future.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        Please check out the
-        configuration documentation below to find out more about Wine's
-        configuration, or proceed to the <link linkend="bugs">Troubleshooting
-        chapter</link>.
-      </para>
-    </sect1>
-
-    <sect1 id="config-file">
-      <title>The Wine Configuration File</title>
       <para>
-        This section is meant to contain both an easy step-by-step introduction
- to the Wine configuration file (for new Wine users)
- and a complete reference to all Wine configuration file settings (for
- advanced users).
-      </para>
-
-      <sect2>
-        <title>Configuration File Introduction</title>
+        Most of the most common configuration changes can be done with the
+        Winecfg tool.  We'll go through an easy, step-by-step introduction
+        to Winecfg and outline the options available.
+        In the next section we'll go over more advanced changes you can make
+        using regedit as well as provide a complete reference to all Wine
+        configuration settings.  Finally, some things you might want to
+        configure fall out of the scope of Winecfg and regedit, and we'll
+        go over those.
+      </para>
+    <sect1 id="using-winecfg">
+      <title>Using Winecfg</title>
+      <para>
+        In the past, Wine used a special configuration file that could be
+         found in <filename>~/.wine/config</filename>.  If you are still using
+         a version of Wine that references this file (older than June, 2005)
+         you should upgrade before doing anything else.  All settings are now
+         stored directly in the registry and accessed by Wine when it starts.
+       </para>
+       <para>
+         Winecfg should have been installed on your computer along with the
+         rest of the Wine programs.  If you can't figure out how to start it,
+         try running the command:
+         <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>/usr/local/bin/winecfg</userinput>
+        </para>
         <para>
-          The Wine configuration file is the central file to store
-  configuration settings for Wine.
-  This file (which is called <filename>config</filename>)
-  can be found in the sub directory <filename>.wine/</filename>
-  of your user's home directory
-  (directory <filename>/home/user/</filename>). In other words, the Wine
-  configuration file is <filename>~/.wine/config</filename>.
-  Note that since the Wine configuration file is a part of the
-  Wine registry file system, this file also
-  <emphasis>requires</emphasis> a correct "WINE REGISTRY
-  Version 2" header line to be recognized properly, just like
-  all other Wine registry text files (just in case you decided
-  to write your own registry file from scratch and wonder why
-  Wine keeps rejecting it).
+ or possibly just:
+         <prompt>$ </prompt><userinput>winecfg</userinput>
         </para>
         <para>
-          The settings available in the configuration file include:
+          When the program starts you'll notice there are tabs along the top
+          of the window for:
           <itemizedlist>
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Directory settings
+                Applications
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                Libraries
               </para>
             </listitem>
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Port settings
+                Graphics
               </para>
             </listitem>
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                The Wine look and feel
+                Appearance
               </para>
             </listitem>
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Wine's DLL usage
+                Drives
               </para>
             </listitem>
             <listitem>
               <para>
-                Wine's multimedia drivers and DLL configuration
+                Audio
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                About
               </para>
             </listitem>
           </itemizedlist>
         </para>
+ <para>
+          Changing settings in the
+          <emphasis>Applications</emphasis> and <emphasis>Libraries</emphasis>
+          tab will have the most impact on getting an application to run.   The
+          other settings focus on getting Wine itself to behave the way
+          you want it to.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+  Note: The Applications, Libraries, and Graphics tabs are linked
+          together!  If you have Default Settings selected under Applications,
+          all of the changes made within the Libraries and Graphics tabs will
+          be changed for all applications.  If you've configured a specfic
+          application under the Applications tab and have it selected, then
+          any changes made in Libraries or Graphics will affect only that
+          application.  This allows for custom settings for specific
+          applications.
+        </para>
+        <sect2 id="config-windows-versions">
+        <title>Application Settings</title>
+        <para>
+          Wine has the ability to mimic the behavior of different versions of
+          Windows.  In general, the biggest difference is whether Wine
+          behaves as a Win9x version or an NT version.  Some applications
+          require a specific behavior in order to function and changing
+          this setting may cause a buggy app to work.  Recently Wine's
+          default Windows version has changed to Windows 2000.  It's known
+          that many applications will perform better if you choose Windows
+          98.
+       </para>
+       <para>
+         Within the tab you'll notice there is a
+         <emphasis>Default Settings</emphasis> entry. If you select that
+         you'll see the current default <emphasis>Windows Version</emphasis>
+         for all applications.  A troublesome application
+         is best configured separately from the Default Settings.  To do that:
+          <orderedlist>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                Click on the <emphasis>Add application</emphasis> button.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                Browse until you locate the .exe
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                After it's been added you can choose the specific Windows
+               version Wine will emulate for that application.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+         </orderedlist>
+        </para>
       </sect2>
-
       <sect2>
-        <title>Creating Or Modifying The Configuration File</title>
+        <title>Libraries Settings</title>
         <para>
-  If you just installed Wine for the first time and want to
-  finish Wine installation by configuring it now, then you could
-  use our sample configuration file <filename>config</filename>
-  (which can be found in the directory
-  <filename>documentation/samples/</filename> of the Wine source
-  code directory) as a base for adapting the Wine configuration
-  file to the settings you want.
-  First, I should mention that you should not forget to make
-  sure that any previous configuration file at
-  <filename>~/.wine/config</filename> has been safely moved out
-  of the way instead of simply overwriting it when you will now
-  copy over the sample configuration file.
+          Likewise, some applications require specific libraries in order
+          to run.  Wine reproduces the Windows system libraries (so-called
+          native DLL's) with completely custom versions designed to
+          function exactly the same way but without requiring licenses
+          from Microsoft.  Wine has many known deficiencies in it's
+          built-in versions, but in many instances the functionality
+          is sufficient.  Using only builtin DLL's ensures that your
+          system is Microsoft-free.  However, Wine has the ability to
+          load native Windows DLL's.
         </para>
- <para>
-  If you don't have a pre-existing configuration file and thus
-  need to copy over our sample configuration file to the
-  standard Wine configuration file location, do in a
-  <glossterm>terminal</glossterm>:
-  <screen>
-  <prompt>$ </><userinput>mkdir ~/.wine/</>
-  <prompt>$ </><userinput>cp <replaceable>dir_to_wine_source_code</replaceable>/documentation/samples/config ~/.wine/config</>
-  </screen>
-  Otherwise, simply use the already existing configuration file
-  at <filename>~/.wine/config</filename>.
- </para>
- <para>
-  Now you can start adapting the configuration file's settings with an
-  <glossterm>editor</glossterm> according to the documentation
-  below.
-  Note that you should <emphasis>only</emphasis> change
-  configuration file settings if wineserver is not running (in
-  other words: if your user doesn't have a Wine session running),
-  otherwise Wine won't use them - and even worse, wineserver will
-  overwrite them with the old settings once wineserver quits!!
- </para>
-      </sect2>
-
-      <sect2 id="config-file-how">
-        <title>What Does It Contain?</title>
-
-        <para>
-  Let's start by giving an overview of which sections a
-  configuration file may contain, and whether the inclusion of
-  the respective section is <emphasis>needed</emphasis> or only <emphasis>recommended</emphasis> ("recmd").
- </para>
-
-        <informaltable frame="all">
-          <tgroup cols="3">
-            <thead>
-              <row>
-                <entry>Section Name</entry>
-                <entry>Needed?</entry>
-                <entry>What it Does</entry>
-              </row>
-            </thead>
-            <tbody>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[wine]</entry>
-                <entry>yes</entry>
-                <entry>General settings for Wine</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[DllOverrides]</entry>
-                <entry>recmd</entry>
-                <entry>Overrides defaults for DLL loading</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[x11drv]</entry>
-                <entry>recmd</entry>
-                <entry>Graphics driver settings</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[fonts]</entry>
-                <entry>yes</entry>
-                <entry>Font appearance and recognition</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[ppdev]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Parallelport emulation</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[spooler]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Print spooling</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[ports]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Direct port access</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[Debug]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>What to do with certain debug messages</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[Registry]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Specifies locations of windows registry files</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[programs]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Programs to be run automatically</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[Console]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Console settings</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[Clipboard]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Interaction for Wine and X11 clipboard</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[afmdirs]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Postscript driver settings</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[WinMM]</entry>
-                <entry>yes</entry>
-                <entry>Multimedia settings</entry>
-              </row>
-              <row>
-                <entry>[AppDefaults]</entry>
-                <entry>no</entry>
-                <entry>Overwrite the settings of previous sections for special programs</entry>
-              </row>
-            </tbody>
-          </tgroup>
-        </informaltable>
-
-        <para>
-  Now let's explain the configuration file sections in a
-  detailed way.
- </para>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-wine">
-          <title>The [wine] Section </title>
-          <para>
-            The [wine] section of the configuration file contains basic settings for Wine.
-    </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>
-"Windows" = "c:\\windows"
-"ShowDirSymlinks" = "1"
-"ShowDotFiles" = "1"
-            </programlisting>
-    For a detailed description of drive layer configuration and
-    the meaning of these parameters, please look at the <link
-    linkend="config-drive-main">Disc Drives, Serial and Parallel
-            Ports section</link>.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"GraphicsDriver" = "x11drv|ttydrv"</programlisting>
-      Sets the graphics driver to use for Wine output.
-      x11drv is for X11 output, ttydrv is for text console output.
-      WARNING: if you use ttydrv here, then you won't be able to run
-      a lot of Windows GUI programs (ttydrv is still pretty "broken"
-      at running graphical apps). Thus this option is mainly interesting
-      for e.g. embedded use of Wine in web server scripts.
-      Note that ttydrv is still very lacking, so if it doesn't work,
-      resort to using "xvfb", a virtual X11 server.
-      Another way to run Wine without display would be to run X11
-      via Xvnc, then connect to that VNC display using xvncviewer
-      (that way you're still able to connect to your app and
-      configure it if need be).
-    </para>
-    <para>
-            <programlisting>"Printer" = "off|on"</programlisting> Tells wine
-            whether to allow printing via printer drivers to work.
-      This option isn't needed for our built-in psdrv printer driver
-      at all.
-            Using these things are pretty alpha, so you might want to
-            watch out. Some people might find it useful, however. If
-            you're not planning to work on printing via windows printer
-      drivers, don't even add this to your wine configuration file
-      (It probably isn't already in it).
-      Check out the [spooler] and [parallelports] sections too.
-          </para>
-    <para>
-      <programlisting>"ShellLinker" = "wineshelllink"</programlisting>
-      This setting specifies the shell linker script to use for setting
-      up Windows icons in e.g. KDE or Gnome that are given by programs
-      making use of appropriate shell32.dll functionality to create
-      icons on the desktop/start menu during installation.
-    </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"SymbolTableFile" = "wine.sym"</programlisting>
-            Sets up the symbol table file for the wine debugger. You
-            probably don't need to fiddle with this. May be useful if
-            your wine is stripped.
-          </para>
-        </sect3>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-dlloverrides">
-          <title>The [DllOverrides] Section</title>
-          <para>
-            The format for this section is the same for each line:
-            <programlisting>&lt;DLL>{,&lt;DLL>,&lt;DLL>...} = &lt;FORM>{,&lt;FORM>,&lt;FORM>...}</programlisting>
-            For example, to load built-in KERNEL pair (case doesn't
-            matter here):
-            <programlisting>"kernel,kernel32" = "builtin"</programlisting>
-            To load the native COMMDLG pair, but if that doesn't work
-            try built-in:
-            <programlisting>"commdlg,comdlg32" = "native, builtin"</programlisting>
-            To load the native COMCTL32:
-            <programlisting>"comctl32" = "native"</programlisting>
-            Here is a good generic setup (As it is defined in config
-            that was included with your wine package):
-            <programlisting>
-[DllOverrides]
-"rpcrt4"       = "builtin, native"
-"oleaut32"     = "builtin, native"
-"ole32"        = "builtin, native"
-"commdlg"      = "builtin, native"
-"comdlg32"     = "builtin, native"
-"ver"          = "builtin, native"
-"version"      = "builtin, native"
-"shell"        = "builtin, native"
-"shell32"      = "builtin, native"
-"shfolder"     = "builtin, native"
-"shlwapi"      = "builtin, native"
-"shdocvw"      = "builtin, native"
-"lzexpand"     = "builtin, native"
-"lz32"         = "builtin, native"
-"comctl32"     = "builtin, native"
-"commctrl"     = "builtin, native"
-"advapi32"     = "builtin, native"
-"crtdll"       = "builtin, native"
-"mpr"          = "builtin, native"
-"winspool.drv" = "builtin, native"
-"ddraw"        = "builtin, native"
-"dinput"       = "builtin, native"
-"dsound"       = "builtin, native"
-"opengl32"     = "builtin, native"
-"msvcrt"       = "native, builtin"
-"msvideo"      = "builtin, native"
-"msvfw32"      = "builtin, native"
-"mcicda.drv"   = "builtin, native"
-"mciseq.drv"   = "builtin, native"
-"mciwave.drv"  = "builtin, native"
-"mciavi.drv"   = "native, builtin"
-"mcianim.drv"  = "native, builtin"
-"msacm.drv"    = "builtin, native"
-"msacm"        = "builtin, native"
-"msacm32"      = "builtin, native"
-"midimap.drv"  = "builtin, native"
-; you can specify programs too
-"notepad.exe"  = "native, builtin"
-; default for all other DLLs
-"*" = "native, builtin"
-            </programlisting>
-          </para>
-          <note>
-            <para>
-              If loading of the libraries that are listed first fails,
-              wine will just go on by using the second or third option.
-            </para>
-          </note>
-        </sect3>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-fonts">
-          <title>The [fonts] Section</title>
-          <para>
-            This section sets up wine's font handling.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"Resolution" = "96"</programlisting>
-            Since the way X handles fonts is different from the way
-            Windows does, wine uses a special mechanism to deal with
-            them. It must scale them using the number defined in the
-            "Resolution" setting. 60-120 are reasonable values, 96 is
-            a nice in the middle one. If you have the real windows
-            fonts available , this parameter will not be as
-            important. Of course, it's always good to get your X fonts
-            working acceptably in wine.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"Default" = "-adobe-times-"</programlisting>
-            The default font wine uses. Fool around with it if you'd like.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-  OPTIONAL:
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            The <literal>Alias</literal> setting allows you to map an X font to a font
-            used in wine. This is good for apps that need a special font you don't have,
-            but a good replacement exists. The syntax is like so:
-            <programlisting>"AliasX" = "[Fake windows name],[Real X name]"&lt;,optional "masking" section></programlisting>
-            Pretty straightforward. Replace "AliasX" with "Alias0",
-            then "Alias1" and so on. The fake windows name is the name
-            that the font will be under a windows app in wine. The
-            real X name is the font name as seen by X (Run
-            "xfontsel"). The optional "masking" section allows you to
-            utilize the fake windows name you define. If it is not
-            used, then wine will just try to extract the fake windows
-            name itself and not use the value you enter.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            Here is an example of an alias without masking. The font will show up in windows
-            apps as "Google".
-            <programlisting>"Alias0" = "Foo,--google-"</programlisting>
-            Here is an example with masking enabled. The font will show up as "Foo" in
-            windows apps.
-            <programlisting>"Alias1" = "Foo,--google-,subst"</programlisting>
-            For more information check out the <link linkend="config-fonts-main">Fonts</link>
-      chapter.
-          </para>
-        </sect3>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-io">
-          <title>The [spooler] and [ports] Sections</title>
-          <para>
-            The [spooler] section will inform wine where to spool
-            print jobs. Use this if you want to try printing. Wine
-            docs claim that spooling is "rather primitive" at this
-            time, so it won't work perfectly. <emphasis>It is optional.</emphasis> The only
-            setting you use in this section works to map a port (LPT1,
-            for example) to a file or a command. Here is an example,
-            mapping LPT1 to the file <filename>out.ps</filename>:
-            <programlisting>"LPT1:" = "out.ps"</programlisting>
-            The following command maps printing jobs to LPT1 to the
-            command <command>lpr</command>. Notice  the |:
-            <programlisting>"LPT1:" = "|lpr"</programlisting>
-            The [ports] section is usually useful only for people who
-            need direct port access for programs requiring dongles or
-            scanners. <emphasis>If you don't need it, don't use
-    it!</emphasis>
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"read" = "0x779,0x379,0x280-0x2a0"</programlisting>
-            Gives direct read access to those IO's.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"write" = "0x779,0x379,0x280-0x2a0"</programlisting>
-            Gives direct write access to those IO's. It's probably a
-            good idea to keep the values of the
-            <literal>read</literal> and <literal>write</literal>
-            settings the same. This stuff will only work when you're
-            root.
-          </para>
-        </sect3>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-debug-etc">
-          <title>The [Debug], [Registry], and [programs] Sections</title>
-          <para>
-            [Debug] is used to include or exclude debug messages, and to
-            output them to a file. The latter is rarely used. <emphasis>These
-            are all optional and you probably don't need to add or
-            remove anything in this section to your config.</emphasis> (In extreme
-            cases you may want to use these options to manage the amount
-            of information generated by <parameter>WINEDEBUG=+relay
-            </parameter> )
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"File" = "/blanco"</programlisting>
-            Sets the logfile for wine. Set to CON to log to standard out.
-            <emphasis>This is rarely used.</emphasis>
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"SpyExclude" = "WM_SIZE;WM_TIMER;"</programlisting>
-            Excludes debug messages about <constant>WM_SIZE</constant>
-            and <constant>WM_TIMER</constant> in the logfile.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"SpyInclude" = "WM_SIZE;WM_TIMER;"</programlisting>
-            Includes debug messages about <constant>WM_SIZE</constant>
-            and <constant>WM_TIMER</constant> in the logfile.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"RelayInclude" = "user32.CreateWindowA;comctl32.*"</programlisting>
-            Include only the listed functions in a
-            <parameter>WINEDEBUG=+relay</parameter> trace.  This entry is
-            ignored if there is a <parameter>RelayExclude</parameter> entry.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"RelayExclude" = "RtlEnterCriticalSection;RtlLeaveCriticalSection"</programlisting>
-            Exclude the listed functions in a
-            <parameter>WINEDEBUG=+relay</parameter> trace.  This entry
-            overrides any settings in a <parameter>RelayInclude</parameter>
-            entry.  If neither entry is present then the trace includes
-            everything.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            In both entries the functions may be specified either as a
-            function name or as a module and function.  In this latter
-            case specify an asterisk for the function name to include/exclude
-            all functions in the module.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            [Registry] can be used to tell wine where your old windows
-            registry files exist. This section is completely optional
-            and useless to people using wine without an existing
-            windows installation.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"UserFileName" = "/dirs/to/user.reg"</programlisting>
-            The location of your old <filename>user.reg</filename> file.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            [programs] can be used to say what programs run under
-            special conditions.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"Default" = "/program/to/execute.exe"</programlisting>
-            Sets the program to be run if wine is started without specifying a program.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            <programlisting>"Startup" = "/program/to/execute.exe"</programlisting>
-            Sets the program to automatically be run at startup every time.
-          </para>
-        </sect3>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-winmm">
-          <title>The [WinMM] Section</title>
-          <para>
-            [WinMM] is used to define which multimedia drivers have to be loaded. Since
-      those drivers may depend on the multimedia interfaces available on your system
-      (OSS, ALSA... to name a few), it's needed to be able to configure which driver
-      has to be loaded.
-          </para>
-
-          <para>
-      The content of the section looks like:
-      <programlisting>
-[WinMM]
-"Drivers" = "wineoss.drv"
-"WaveMapper" = "msacm.drv"
-"MidiMapper" = "midimap.drv"
-      </programlisting>
-      All the keys must be defined:
-      <itemizedlist>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-    The "Drivers" key is a ';' separated list of modules name, each of
-    them containing a low level driver. All those drivers will be loaded
-    when MMSYSTEM/WINMM is started and will provide their inner features.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-    The "WaveMapper" represents the name of the module containing the Wave
-    Mapper driver. Only one wave mapper can be defined in the system.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-    The "MidiMapper" represents the name of the module containing the MIDI
-    Mapper driver. Only one MIDI mapper can be defined in the system.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-      </itemizedlist>
-          </para>
-   </sect3>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-network">
-          <title>The [Network] Section</title>
-          <para>
-            [Network] contains settings related to
-            networking. Currently there is only one value that can be set.
-          </para>
-          <variablelist>
-            <varlistentry>
-              <term>UseDnsComputerName</term>
-              <listitem>
-                <para>
-                  A boolean setting (default: <literal>Y</literal>)
-                  that affects the way Wine sets the computer name. The computer
-                  name in the Windows world is the so-called <emphasis>NetBIOS name</emphasis>.
-                  It is contained in the <varname>ComputerName</varname> in the registry entry
-                  <varname>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\ComputerName\ComputerName</varname>.
-                </para>
-                <para>
-                  If this option is set to "Y" or missing, Wine will set the
-                  NetBIOS name to the Unix host name of your computer, if
-                  necessary truncated to 31 characters. The Unix hostname is the output
-                  of the shell command <command>hostname</command>, up to but not
-                  including the first dot ('.'). Among other things, this means that
-                  Windows programs running under Wine cannot change the NetBIOS computer name.
-                </para>
-                <para>
-                  If this option is set to "N", Wine will use the registry value above
-                  to set the NetBIOS name. Only if the registry entry doesn't exist (usually
-                  only during the first wine startup) it will use the Unix hostname as
-                  usual. Windows programs can change the NetBIOS name. The change
-                  will be effective after a "reboot", i.e. after restarting Wine.
-                </para>
-              </listitem>
-            </varlistentry>
-          </variablelist>
-        </sect3>
-
-        <sect3 id="config-appdefaults">
-          <title>The [AppDefaults] Section</title>
-          <para>
-            The section is used to overwrite certain settings of this file for a
-            special program with different settings.
-            [AppDefaults] is not the real name of the section. The real name
-            consists of the leading word AppDefaults followed by the name
-            of the executable the section is valid for.
-      The end of the section name is the name of the
-      corresponding "standard" section of the configuration file
-      that should have some of its settings overwritten with the
-      program specific settings you define.
-      The three parts of the section name are separated by two backslashes.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            Currently wine supports overriding selected settings within
-      the sections [DllOverrides], [x11drv], [version] and [dsound] only.
-          </para>
+        <sect3>
+          <title>DLL Overrides</title>
           <para>
-            Here is an example that overrides the normal settings for a
-            program:
-      <programlisting>
-;; default settings
-[x11drv]
-"Managed" = "Y"
-"Desktop" = "N"
-
-;; run install in desktop mode
-[AppDefaults\\install.exe\\x11drv]
-"Managed" = "N"
-"Desktop" = "800x600"
-      </programlisting>
-          </para>
-        </sect3>
+            It's not always possible to run an application on builtin
+            DLL's.  Sometimes native DLL's simply work better.  After
+            you've located a native DLL on a Windows system, you'll
+            need to place it in suitable place for Wine to find it
+            and then configure it to be used.  Generally the place
+            you need to put it is in the directory you've configured
+            to be <filename>c:\windows\system</filename> (more on that in
+            the drives section).  There are four DLL's you should never
+            try to use the native versions of:
+            <filename>kernel32.dll</filename>,
+            <filename>gdi32.dll</filename>,
+            <filename>user32.dll</filename>,
+            and <filename>ntdll.dll</filename>.  These libraries require
+            low-level Windows kernel access that simply doesn't exist
+            within Wine.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            With that in mind, once you've copied the DLL you just need to
+            tell Wine to try to use it.  You can configure Wine to choose
+            between native and builtin DLL's at two different levels.
+            If you have <emphasis>Default Settings</emphasis> selected
+            in the <emphasis>Applications</emphasis> tab, the changes you
+            make will affect all applications.  Or, you can override the
+            global settings on a per-application level by adding and
+            selecting an application in the <emphasis>Applications</emphasis>  
+            tab.
+         </para>
+         <para>
+           To add an override for FOO.DLL, enter "FOO" into the box
+           labeled <emphasis>New override for library:</emphasis> and
+           click on the <emphasis>Add</emphasis> button.  To change how
+           the DLL behaves, select it within the <emphasis>Existing
+           overrides:</emphasis> box and choose <emphasis>Edit</emphasis>.  
+           By default the new load order will be native Windows libraries
+           before Wine's own builtin ones (<emphasis>Native then
+           Builtin</emphasis>).  You can also choose native only, builtin
+           only, or disable it altogether.
+         </para>
+         </sect3>
+         <sect3>
+          <title>Notes About System DLL's</title>
+          <para>
+            The Wine team has determined that it is necessary to create fake DLL
+            files to trick many programs that check for file existence to
+            determine whether a particular feature (such as Winsock and its
+            TCP/IP networking) is available. If this is a problem for you, you
+            can create empty files in the configured c:\windows\system directory
+            to make the program think it's there, and Wine's built-in DLL will
+            be loaded when the program actually asks for it. (Unfortunately,
+            tools/wineinstall does not create such empty files itself.)
+         </para>
+         <para>
+           Applications sometimes also try to inspect the version resources
+           from the physical files (for example, to determine the DirectX
+           version). Empty files will not do in this case, it is rather
+           necessary to install files with complete version resources. This
+           problem is currently being worked on. In the meantime, you may still
+           need to grab some real DLL files to fool these apps with.
+         </para>
+         <para>
+           There are of course DLLs that Wine does not currently implement
+           very well (or at all). If you do not have a real Windows you can
+           copy necessary DLLs from, you can always get some from one of the
+           Windows DLL archive sites that can be found via internet search
+           engine. Please make sure to obey any licenses on the DLLs you
+           fetch; some are redistributable, some aren't.
+         </para>
+       </sect3>
+       <sect3>
+         <title>Missing DLL's</title>
+         <para>
+           In case Wine complains about a missing DLL, you should check whether
+           this file is a publicly available DLL or a custom DLL belonging
+           to your program (by searching for its name on the internet).
+           After you've located the DLL, you need to make sure Wine is able to
+           use it.  DLLs usually get loaded in the following order:
+           <orderedlist>
+             <listitem>
+               <para>
+                 The directory the program was started from.
+               </para>
+             </listitem>
+             <listitem>
+               <para>
+                 The current directory.
+               </para>
+             </listitem>
+             <listitem>
+               <para>
+                 The Windows system directory.
+               </para>
+             </listitem>
+             <listitem>
+               <para>
+                 The Windows directory.
+               </para>
+             </listitem>
+             <listitem>
+               <para>
+                 The PATH variable directories.
+               </para>
+             </listitem>
+           </orderedlist>
+           In short: either put the required DLL into your program
+           directory (might be ugly), or put it into the Windows system
+           directory.  Also, if possible you probably shouldn't use NT-based
+           native DLLs, since Wine's NT API support is somewhat weaker than
+           its Win9x API support (possibly leading to even worse compatibility
+           with NT DLLs than with a no-windows setup!).
+          </para>
+        </sect3>
+      </sect2>
+      <sect2>
+        <title>Graphics Settings</title>
+        <para>
+          There are basically five different graphics settings you
+          can configure.  For most people the defaults are fine.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          The first is the "screen color depth" and
+          represents the number of colors that can be displayed on the
+          screen.  Older graphics cards had a hard time displaying a
+          full-range of colors and for them it's useful to be able to
+          specify an "8-bit" display.  Modern video cards, namely anything
+          with over 8MB of memory, have no problem using a full 24 or 32-bit
+          depth.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          The next few settings primarily affect games and are somewhat
+          self-explanatory.  You can prevent the mouse from leaving the
+          window of a DirectX program (i.e. a game.) and the default is
+          to have that box checked.  There's lots of
+          reasons you might want to do that, not the least of which
+          includes it's easier to play the game if the cursor is
+          confined to a smaller area.  The other reason to turn this
+          option on is for more precise control of the mouse - Wine
+          warps the location of the mouse to mimic the way Windows
+          works.  Similarly, "desktop double buffering" allows for
+          smoother updates to the screen, which games can benefit from,
+          and the default is to leave it turned on.  The tradeoff is
+          increased memory use.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          You may find it helpful to <emphasis>Emulate a virtual
+          desktop</emphasis>.
+          In this case, all programs will run in a separate window. You
+          may find this useful as a way to test buggy games that change
+          (possibly unsuccessfully) the screen resolution.  Confining them
+          to a window can allow for more control over them at the possible
+          expense of decreased usability.  Sizes you might want to try are
+          640x480 (the default) or 800x600.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          Finally, you can configure some Direct3D settings.  For the
+          most part these settings are detected automatically, but you
+          can force them to behave in a specific manner.  Some games
+          attempt to probe the underlying system to see if it supports
+          specific features.  By turning these off Wine won't report
+          the ability to render games in a certain way.  It may lead
+          to the game running faster at the expense of the quality of
+          the graphics or the game may not run at all.
+        </para>
+ </sect2>
+        <sect2>
+          <title>Drive Settings</title>
+  <para>
+            Windows requires a fairly rigid drive configuration that Wine
+            imitates.  Most people are familiar with the standard notation
+            of the "A:" drive representing the floppy disk, the "C:"
+            drive representing the primary system disk, etc.   Wine uses
+            the same concept and maps those drives to the underlying native
+            filesystem.
+          </para><para>
+            Wine's drive configuration is relatively simple.
+            In Winecfg under the <emphasis>Drives</emphasis> tab you'll
+            see buttons to add and remove available drives.
+            When you choose to add a drive, a new entry will be made
+            and a default drive mapping will appear.  You can change where
+            this drives points to by changing what's in the
+            <emphasis>Path:</emphasis> box.  If you're unsure of the
+            exact path you can choose "Browse" to search for it.
+            Removing a drive is as easy as selecting the drive and
+            clicking "Remove".
+           </para><para>
+            Winecfg has the ability to automatically detect the drives
+            available on your system.  It's recommended you try this
+            before attempting to configure drives manually.  Simply
+            click on the <emphasis>Autodetect</emphasis> button to
+            have Wine search for drives on your system.
+           </para><para>
+            You may be interested in configuring your drive settings
+            outside of Winecfg, in which case you're in luck because it's
+            quite easy.  All of the drive settings reside in a special
+            directory, <filename>~/.wine/dosdevices</filename>.  Each "drive"
+            is simply a link to where it actually resides.  Wine automatically
+            sets up two drives the first time you run Wine:
+           </para>
+           <programlisting>
+             $ ls -la ~/.wine/dosdevices/
+             lrwxrwxrwx  1 wineuser wineuser   10 Jul 23 15:12 c: -> ../drive_c
+             lrwxrwxrwx  1 wineuser wineuser    1 Jul 23 15:12 z: -> /
+           </programlisting>
+           <para>
+             To add another drive, for example your CD-ROM, just create a new
+             link pointing to it:
+               <prompt>$ </prompt>
+               <userinput>ln -s /mnt/cdrom ~/.wine/dosdevices/d:</userinput>
+             Take note of the DOS-style naming convention used for links -
+             the format is a letter followed by a colon, such as "a:".  So,
+             if the link to your c: drive points to
+               <filename> ~/.wine/drive_c</filename>, you
+             can interpret references to <filename>c:\windows\system</filename>
+             to mean <filename> ~/.wine/drive_c/windows/system</filename>.
+  </para>
+        </sect2>
+ <sect2>
+        <title>Audio Settings</title>
+        <para>
+          Wine can work with quite a few different audio subsystems
+          which you can choose under the "Audio" tab.  The
+          "Autodetect" button can figure it all out for you, or you can
+          manually select a driver.  Older
+          Linux distributions using the 2.4 kernel or earlier typically
+          use the "OSS" driver.  Newer 2.6 kernels have switched to "ALSA".
+          If you're using KDE, regardless of the kernel, you can probably
+          also use "aRts".  If you're using GNOME you can probably use
+          EsounD.  The OSS and ALSA audio drivers get the most testing, so
+          it's recommended you stick with them if possible.  
+          If you need to use "Jack" or "NAS" you probably already know why.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          DirectSound settings are primarily used by games.  You can
+          choose what level of hardware acceleration you'd like, but
+          for most people "Full" is fine.  
+        </para>
       </sect2>
-
-      <sect2 id="config-trouble">
-        <title>What If It Doesn't Work?</title>
-        <para>
-          There is always a chance that things will go wrong. If the
-          unthinkable happens, report the problem to
-    <ulink url="http://bugs.winehq.org/">Wine Bugzilla</ulink>,
-    try the newsgroup
-          <systemitem>comp.emulators.ms-windows.wine</systemitem>,
-    or the IRC channel <systemitem>#WineHQ</systemitem> found on
-          irc.freenode.net, or connected servers.
-    Make sure that you have looked over this document thoroughly,
-    and have also read:
-        </para>
-        <itemizedlist>
-          <listitem>
-            <para>
-              <filename>README</filename>
-            </para>
-          </listitem>
-          <listitem>
-            <para>
-              <filename>http://www.winehq.org/trouble/</filename>
-            </para>
-          </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist>
-        <para>
-          If indeed it looks like you've done your research, be
-          prepared for helpful suggestions. If you haven't, brace
-          yourself for heaving flaming.
+      <sect2>
+      <title>Appearance</title>
+      <para>
+        Wine can load Windows themes if you have them available.  While
+        this certainly isn't necessary in order to use Wine or applications,
+        it does allow you to customize the look and feel of a program.  Wine
+        supports the newer MSStyles typ of themese.  Unlike the older Microsoft
+        Plus! style themes, the uxtheme engine supports special .msstyles files
+        that can retheme all of the Windows controls. This is more or less the
+        same kind of theming that modern Linux desktops have supported for
+        years. If you'd like to try this out:
+          <orderedlist>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                Download a Windows XP theme. Be sure it contains a .msstyles
+                file.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                Create a set of new directories in your fake Windows drive:
+                <prompt>$ </prompt>
+                <userinput>mkdir -p ~/.wine/drive_c/windows/Resources/themes/name-of-your-theme</userinput>
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                Move the .msstyles to that new name-of-your-theme directory.
+             </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                Use the new Appearance tab of winecfg to select the new theme.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+          </orderedlist>
         </para>
       </sect2>
     </sect1>
-
-    <sect1 id="config-drive-main">
-      <title>Disc Drives, Serial and Parallel Ports</title>
-      <sect2>
-        <title>Extremely Important Prerequisites</title>
- <para>
-  If you're planning to include access to a CD-ROM drive in your Wine
-  configuration on Linux, then <emphasis>make sure</emphasis> to add
-  the <quote>unhide</quote> mount option to the CD-ROM file system
-  entry in <filename>/etc/fstab</filename>, e.g.:
-  <programlisting>/dev/cdrom /cdrom  iso9660 ro,noauto,users,unhide 0 0</programlisting>
-  Several Windows program setup CD-ROMs or other CD-ROMs chose
-  to do such braindamaged things as marking very important setup
-  helper files on the CD-ROM as <quote>hidden</quote>.
-  That's no problem on Windows, since the Windows CD-ROM driver by
-  default displays even files that are supposed to be
-  <quote>hidden</quote>. But on Linux, which chose to
-  <emphasis>hide</emphasis> <quote>hidden</quote> files on CD by
-  default, this is <emphasis>FATAL</emphasis>!
-  (the programs will simply abort with an <quote>installation file not found</quote> or similar error)
-  Thus you should never forget to add this setting.
- </para>
+    <sect1 id="using-regedit">
+      <title>Using the Registry and Regedit</title>
+      <para>
+        All of the settings you change in Winecfg, with exception of
+        the drive settings, are ultimately stored in the registry.
+        In Windows, this is a central repository for the configuration
+        of applications and the operating system.  Likewise, Wine
+        implements a registry and some settings not found in Winecfg
+        can be changed within it.  (There's actually more of a chance
+        you'll need to dip into the registry to change an applications'
+        settings than Wine itself.)
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        Now, the fact that Wine itself uses the registry to store settings
+        has been controversial.  Some people argue that it's too much like
+        Windows.  To counter this, there's several things to consider.
+        First, it's impossible to avoid implementing a registry simply
+        because applications expect to be able to store their settings there.
+        In order for Wine to store and access settings in a separate
+        configuration file would require a separate set of code to basically
+        do the same thing as the Win32 API's Wine already implements.
+        Finally, unlike Windows, the Wine registry is written in plain text
+        and can be changed using your favorite text editor.  While most sane
+        system administrators (and Wine developers) curse madly at the twisted
+        nature of the Windows registry, it is still necessary for Wine to
+        support it somehow.
+      </para>
+      <sect2>
+        <title>Registry Structure</title>
+        <para>
+          Okay.. with that out of the way, let's dig into the registry a bit
+          to see how it's laid out.  The Windows registry is an elaborate tree
+          structure, and not even most Windows programmers are fully aware of
+          how the registry is laid out, with its different "hives" and numerous
+          links between them; a full coverage is out of the scope of
+          this document. But here are the basic registry keys you might
+          need to know about for now:
+        </para>
+        <variablelist>
+          <varlistentry>
+            <term>HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE</term>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                This fundamental root key (in win9x it's stored in the
+                hidden file <filename>system.dat</filename>) contains
+                everything pertaining to the current Windows
+                installation.  This is often abbreviated HKLM.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+          </varlistentry>
+          <varlistentry>
+            <term>HKEY_USERS</term>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                This fundamental root key (in win9x it's stored in the
+                hidden file <filename>user.dat</filename>) contains
+                configuration data for every user of the installation.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+          </varlistentry>
+          <varlistentry>
+            <term>HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT</term>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                This is a link to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Classes.
+                It contains data describing things like file
+                associations, OLE document handlers, and COM classes.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+          </varlistentry>
+          <varlistentry>
+            <term>HKEY_CURRENT_USER</term>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                This is a link to HKEY_USERS\your_username, i.e., your
+                personal configuration.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+          </varlistentry>
+        </variablelist>
       </sect2>
-
       <sect2>
-        <title>Short Introduction</title>
+        <title>Registry Files</title>
         <para>
-          Windows applications refer to disc drives by letters such as
-          <filename>A:</filename>, <filename>B:</filename> and
-          <filename>C:</filename>, and to serial and parallel ports by names
-          such as <filename>COM1</filename>: and <filename>LPT1:</filename>.
+          Now, what you're probably wondering is how that translates
+          into Wine's structure.   The registry layout described above
+          actually lives in four different files within each user's
+          ~/.wine directory:
         </para>
+        <variablelist>
+          <varlistentry>
+            <term><filename>system.reg</filename></term>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                This file contains HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+          </varlistentry>
+          <varlistentry>
+            <term><filename>user.reg</filename></term>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                This file contains HKEY_CURRENT_USER.
+              </para>
+            </listitem>
+          </varlistentry>
+          <varlistentry>
+            <term><filename>userdef.reg</filename></term>
+            <listitem>
+              <para>
+                This file co